Silent readers

Posted on January 30, 2007

I know there must be a bunch of silent readers out there who have stopped by here to read. I hope you’re able to take something useful away. I hope maybe in some small way I can help you reach out to people you know and care about who are dealing with depression.

I changed the comments so you can now leave anonymous comments. There’s no way to trace who you are. Even the statistics counters aren’t that good. Please consider saying hi. Or if there’s something that I could write about that would be useful, please say so. I can’t promise I will, but knowing what you’d find helpful would help me.

Take a seat. Rest for a few minutes. Have a hot beverage.

If you were to meet me in real life, we couldn’t have this conversation, talking so openly and honestly about depression. I could be just like your sister, your daughter, your friend.
Hi. My name is Rivka.

4 Comments

  1. Rivka

    Anon, I’m glad you found your way here and that you don’t feel alone. None of us should have to feel that way, even though depression cuts us off even from those who care most.

    My life has taken another turn, now dealing with my mom’s slow death from terminal cancer. I haven’t taken much time to deal with my emotions, but the time will come, I’m sure.

  2. Anonymous

    rivka,

    i just found your blog yesterday (in looking up the definition of a hebrew phrase). i am a reform jewish girl going through a rough time. so much of what you say (not all, but too much) hits close to home, but my reaction is “i don’t want that to be me”. i am trying to get through this, and reading that someone else feels so many of the same things really helps me to know that i’m not insane, i’m not making this stuff up. there really is nothing wrong in my life, why am i so miserable? anyway, i just wanted to thank you for blogging about your journey. i know it must be difficult, but random people appreciate it more than you know. i hope that we both get through this (no, i haven’t read everything yet, so i don’t know how you’re coping now, but i hope that you’re doing better!).

    thank you very much.

  3. Rivka

    Hi Loy: thanks for writing, and for linking me on your blog. I hope my process can be helpful. Obviously it’s going to be unique to each person, but maybe I can help people understand depression doesn’t make us freaks. Or maybe I’ll just confirm it. 🙂

    Thank you.

  4. Anonymous

    hi Rivka,

    I’m not such a silent reader, since I’ve linked you on my blog, but I’ll comment anyway! I come here to hear your words and learn from your process, and also to say a prayer for you…

    I pray that your journey through darkness will bring light to others, and light to you, in its fulness.

    Many blessings to you — the one who prays for wings like a dove!

    Loy

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